Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Visit to Jantar Mantar @ Jaipur

As a part of the tour the students of Einstein campus visited the Jantar Mantar at Jaipur. It is a marvel created by Raja Jai Singh the ruler of Jaipur which stands testimony to the human intelligence and craftsman ship at an age when there was no technology and sophisticated gadgets.
In the early 18th century, Maharaja Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five Jantar Mantars in total, in Delhi, Jaipur, Ujjain, Mathura and Varanasi; they were completed between 1724 and 1735.
The Jantars have interesting names like, Samrat Yantra, Jai Prakash, Ram Yantra and Niyati Chakra; each of which are used to for various astronomical calculations. The primary purpose of the observatory was to compile astronomical tables, and to predict the times and movements of the sun, moon and planets.
The observatory consists of fourteen major geometric devices for measuring time, predicting eclipses, tracking stars' location as the earth orbits around the sun. Each is a fixed and 'focused' tool. The Samrat Yantra, the largest instrument, is 90 feet (27 m) high, its shadow carefully plotted to tell the time of day. Its face is angled at 27 degrees, the latitude of Jaipur. The Hindu chhatri (small cupola) on top is used as a platform for announcing eclipses and the arrival of monsoons.
Built from local stone and marble, each instrument carries an astronomical scale, generally marked on the marble inner lining. Bronze tablets, all extraordinarily accurate, were also employed. Thoroughly restored in 1901, the Jantar Mantar was declared a national monument in 1948.
An excursion through Jai Singh's Jantar is a unique experience of walking through solid geometry and encountering a collective astronomical system designed to probe the heavens.
A visit to Jantar Mantar has truly evoked a thought process and curiosity among the children about constellations, sun signs and predictions of the future.







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